English For Brazilians: How to Really Say “Chato” in English

Hey guys, I’m Justin, welcome to another one minute episode of RealLife TV.

Today, I’m going to teach you Brazilians how to really translate the word “chato” into English. Stay tuned!

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Transcript

What Does CHATO Mean in English?

Ok, so, Brazilians always come to me speaking English and they say “this person is boring,” “this place is boring,” but I know they’re not really trying to say boring, because there’re lots of mistranslations in dictionaries and a lot of people just have a wrong understanding of the word chato.

So, chato, in English, means two things. There’s chato irritating, which is annoying, and then there is chato which is more like something that’s tedious, that’s… That’s boring.

So, make sure that when you use the word chato you understand which one you’re using, annoying or boring.

Thank you very much!

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20 Comments

  1. Helen Lagares on March 6, 2014 at 4:47 pm

    So, I can use boring when I mean the place is tedious or even a person?! Thanks for sharing the video! 🙂

  2. Elaine Izabel Coelho Mattos on March 6, 2014 at 5:37 pm

    Thanks for sharing this vídeo. How do you say: Isso foi tão chato ter acontecido!!! Maybe "sad"?!!!

  3. Zulmira Andrade Rabelo on March 6, 2014 at 6:20 pm

    Great, thank you Justin.

  4. Douglas Brian Trent on March 6, 2014 at 6:59 pm

    It is never boring with your great videos to help those wanting to learn!

  5. ?. ?. ????? ??????? on March 7, 2014 at 9:47 pm

    Very good sir

  6. Ricardo Ferreira on March 8, 2014 at 4:57 am

    There's more to chato than those two ones. You can use chato to describe a situation as well, in which case annoying or tedious do not work. In my opinion, this is not the right way to go about teaching languages.

    • Justin on March 11, 2014 at 7:51 pm

      Hey Ricardo, Thanks for watching the video. Yeah, I know there are other uses (maybe you’d care to enlighten us?), but this simple 1 minute video covers the main error that 95% of Brazilian English speakers make. Thanks for watching!

  7. Ricardo Ferreira on March 8, 2014 at 5:04 am

    Hi Elaine. I just commented on this further up. I guess it will depend on what actually happened. If it refers to someone's death for example, an "I'm (deeply) sorry to hear that" will do. Now if it's a flatmate that will keep on lying to you, you'd probably say something along the lines of "what a shame".. Now as I also said earlier on, I don't think that translating words in this way is a good way of teaching/learning any language, especially if the words are not in context. Unless you're some sort of interpreter and are doing some training, I don't see the point of this type of explanation. It just confuses learners.

  8. Justin Murray on March 11, 2014 at 10:57 pm

    Hi Elaine, Thanks for the comment. It depends on the context, but for something that really bothers you, maybe in a situation that is not formal "it really sucks that that happened."

  9. Justin Murray on March 11, 2014 at 10:57 pm

    Hi Elaine, Thanks for the comment. It depends on the context, but for something that really bothers you, maybe in a situation that is not formal "it really sucks that that happened."

  10. Justin Murray on March 11, 2014 at 10:57 pm

    Hey Douglas, Thank you for watching and commenting! Really appreciate the support.

  11. Justin Murray on March 11, 2014 at 10:57 pm

    Hey Douglas, Thank you for watching and commenting! Really appreciate the support.

  12. Justin Murray on March 11, 2014 at 10:57 pm

    Yeah, you got it, Helen! Thanks for watching and commenting!

  13. Justin Murray on March 11, 2014 at 10:57 pm

    Yeah, you got it, Helen! Thanks for watching and commenting!

  14. Justin Murray on March 11, 2014 at 10:57 pm

    Your welcome Zulmira!

  15. Justin Murray on March 11, 2014 at 10:57 pm

    Your welcome Zulmira!

  16. Justin Murray on March 11, 2014 at 10:58 pm

    Hey Ricardo, Thanks for watching the video. Yeah, I know there are other uses (maybe you’d care to create a resource?), but this simple 1 minute video covers the main error that 95% of Brazilian English speakers make. Thanks for watching!

  17. Justin Murray on March 11, 2014 at 10:58 pm

    Hey Ricardo, Thanks for watching the video. Yeah, I know there are other uses (maybe you’d care to create a resource?), but this simple 1 minute video covers the main error that 95% of Brazilian English speakers make. Thanks for watching!

  18. Travis Beyer on March 12, 2014 at 2:55 am

    Justin how long you going to stay in Brazil?

  19. Travis Beyer on March 12, 2014 at 2:55 am

    Justin how long you going to stay in Brazil?

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